Category Archives: Northwest

Henline Mountain with Snow

Beginning of Hike

Beginning

Retirement means you can go on a hike when conditions are optimum, which is what I did today Dec. 3 going up Henline Mountain Trail #3352. For some reason we have many days of sunshine beginning here in Oregon so I decided to touch winter by way of Henline Mountain. I really did not expect there to be much snow but I found a good fresh covering.

IMG_2778

No Snow

The route is about a 5 mile round trip  with a 2220′ vertical. Not an easy hike, you are basically climbing at a fairly steep grade all the way and then coming back down does a toll on your knees.

But this hike was a great workout which should help get me ready for skiing. On this day there was no snow at the start however, soon you could tell that there was plenty of snow up on the trees. Some of this snow was coming down as I ascended, but more was coming down as I descended the mountain. I noticed a great overlook site about a mile up which I figured I might use for a break on the way down.

At about this point the snow pack on the trail was becoming real and then the final mile the snow did make the hike a bit more challenging. Brook loved it though.

The sky was blue and the contrast with the trees and snow was stunning. There were a set of foot prints from the previous day but it was obvious that this trail is not heavily used. I had the mountain to myself. The final approach to the lookout spot is even steeper and with the snow depth increasing this was kind of fun.

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Once at the top you have a 360 vista with Mt Jefferson prominent to the East. However, it was probably about 30 degrees with a slight breeze so it was a bit cold.

 

We took out photos, ate some lunch and headed down. IMG_2819While I was at the top a lot of snow must have fallen off of those trees because the snow on the trail was much more pronounced.

 

In fact the snow falling from the various tree branched made for some serious snow dogging. Brook got hit once on her back by a large drop and it totally freaked her out. Once we got back to that overlook below snow line we took some time to enjoy the scenery.

Actually spent a t least an hour just soaking up the sun and enjoying the view. What better place to spend an afternoon.

We did get on the trail in time to get back to the car at sundown. The dirt portion of the road in was in OK shape.

Tillamook Head Trail from Seaside TH

IMG_2539A great backpacking trip in November when the weather is nice is the Tillamook Head Trail through Ecola State Park. IMG_2548I went on this trip with Brook and my new friend, Judd Beck, whom I met on my Timberline Trail trip in September. We arrived at the Seaside Trailhead to find that there was no overnight parking so you need to park back down the road about .2 miles in a small turnout. The plan was to overnight in the Hikers Camp which is 4 miles in and about 1200 vertical.

We got a late start which meant we would probably arrive in the dark but we would get some sunset views. IMG_2589The hike is a nice workout but very doable for a day hike as well. We assumed that we would have the Hikers Camp which consists of 3 log cabins and support facilities made for an extremely comfortable night especially with the strong wind from the east.

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The cabins have 4 bunks with plenty of space and a nice tarp door cover. No issues at all with rodents.

The evening was a bit exciting due to a large tree falling about 20 yards from our cabin. It sounded like gun fire as the trunk broke into splinters. Brook again slept outside somewhere in the area keeping watch on Judd and I. The next day we hiked down to the viewpoint of the Tillamook Head Lighthouse. IMG_2627On the way you pass an old WWII Bunker that has stimulated a number of questions about why it was built there.

The bunker was part of a radar station that kept a lookout for enemy aircraft. In fact, this reinforced structure held up the gigantic antennae, which were about 30 feet tall. Article We did not attempt to enter the bunker.

Hiking back to our car on a beautiful almost 60 degree day made for an excellent trip.

Suiattle River TH to Rainy Pass

Another one of those trips that I was denied in the past due to unforeseen events, in this case the Blakenship fire in 2015 that closed the PCT.

Suiattle River Trail

Suiattle River Trail

So I return to take it on starting at the Suiattle River Trailhead with Rainy Pass as the destination about 58 miles with a stop in Stehekin where a couple of buddies will join me. This trip was made possible thanks to a good friend who gave me a ride from Rainy Pass where I left my car to the Suiattle River TH. I had been on the Suiattle River Trail a couple of times with a great trip to Image Lake, so the first part of this trip was all prep for the climb over Suiattle Pass and on to Rainy Pass.

@AussieBrook and I got to the trailhead late Saturday June 30th but was still able to make it to Canyon Creek for the first night. It rained most of the day, but I was sparred from the rain for most of the hike.

Suiattle River Trail Slide

Suiattle River Trail Slide

I was impressed with the work done to allow passage through a recent tree slide that blocked the trail. Overall the Suiattle River Trail is one of the finest in Washington.SuiattleRiverTrailBridge

The goal for Sunday was to get close to Suiattle Pass to prepare for the crossing the following day.

PCT Closure Sign from 2015

PCT Closure Sign from 2015

I ended up camping at Miners Creek PCT mile 2549. It was a damp day but again I was sparred from getting wet. Once I got on the PCT I started to encounter the first of the SOBO hikers. At my eventual campsite I met a young man who had been a HS Math Teacher but was now going to hike to Mexico. Unfortunately he had just come off a tough night where he had to make camp on a tuft of snow on Suiattle Pass due to a headache and darkness. I will give that young man a 50% chance of completing the PCT. From these hikers I did learn that there was a lot of snow on Suiattle Pass but at least I should be able to follow their footsteps. I was thinking a mile of so of snow. It was a bummer to wakeup to rain knowing that I would be hiking through snow. After I began my decent north from the pass into the Agnes River drainage I met other hikers who alerted me to the additional 4 miles of snow ahead.

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Morning Sun

Campsite Morning Sun

Overall it was about 5 miles of snow with occasional trail breaks. The snow was soft and footing was treacherous, I went down many times. But what a joyous day of rain, wind and snow. And to finish off the day I got to ford a cold stream. I ended up camping at a great established campsite at PCT mile 2557. Checkout this video of Brook scratching her butt. We were fairly soaked but the skies did clear and we woke to relatively dry sunny conditions.

I was so glad that I had started a day early then I originally planned since now I had the option to go to Stehekin on the 4th in preparation to meet my buddies on the 5th.

Plus this stretch along the South Fork of the Agnes was all down hill so we had an easy day except for a treacherous ford at PCT mile 2559. StreamCrossingNormally I might put on my crocs for a river ford but this river was roaring and my boots were already wet so I just sloughed my way through. Unfortunately, this river was flowing a bit too strong for my 35 lb dog, Brook. She got fairly nervous as I crossed first to leave my pack in order to come back to lead her. Nope, the current was too strong so I ended up carrying her across. From here on the sun was shining and we started to dry out. Ended up at a nice campsite PCT mile 2564.

Brook was in heaven chasing the many squirrels up trees that were far enough apart to prevent their easy escape.

She tormented the squirrels all waking hours that evening and the following morning.

July 4th we hiked to High Bridge enjoying huckleberries and then catching a ride with a park worker and hit the Stehekin Bakery for lunch. StehekinBakeryThe weather was superb so we thoroughly enjoyed our 24 hrs of rest. I wanted to go to the Ranch for dinner, however, they couldn’t really accommodate Brook. We ended up camping in the Lakeview campground with a Mountain House meal of Beef Stew before hanging out on the deck drinking beer with the many SOBO backpackers.

LakeChelan

Lake Chelan

Also a big thank you to the store manager who was extremely accommodating for all and sold bottle of beer for $2.50.

July 5th my friends; Bob and Pete, arrived on the Lady Express boat at 11:00 am and I made them deal with the National Park campsite permitting for our remaining nights on the PCT portion of the trail inside the NP boundary up to Rainy Pass. We hit the trail in the heat of the afternoon which turned out to be the hottest day of the trip.

We only went about 5 miles to Bridge Creek Camp but with it being uphill it was a good workout.

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The following day was again a climb but a beautiful lunch stop at the confluence of Bridge and Maple Creek offered a trip highlight.

We camped that night at Six Mile PCT mile 2583. We had some short rain periods to deal with along with more hungry mosquitoes but we woke up ready to finish the trip on Saturday 7th.

The final stretch offered many scenic views along with a number of interesting stream crossings. Since I had to take my buddies to their car in Chelan, I took the opportunity to stop at the Washington Pass Overlook to take in the American Alps.

Helping Habitat ReStore Sell Online

After retiring and satisfying my need to venture into the wilderness for a number of backpacking trips I have settled back into a volunteer role helping fulfill the mission of Swedemom Center of Giving, SCOG, by helping move our local Habitat ReStore forward with online sales. SwedemomLogoThis all started in 2015 when I helped startup MacHub which laid the groundwork for the SCOG dream. I departed for a year working in Washington and much progress occurred as MacHub became a Causal Hub for the Yamhill County Gospel Rescue Mission under the umbrella of Swedemom Center of Giving and McMinnville Habitat ReStore transitioned from a partial hub to become a full Causal hub. The SCOG mission has always been “To generate financial stability for all nonprofit organizations and ensure the success of their programs”. This has proven to be possible and I am fortunate to have found a way that I can be a part of this dream.

Swedemom provides specialized financial assistance to other nonprofits through the Swedemom LLC online sales platform which utilizes eBay and other similar online sales networks. Our nonprofit partners collect donations of quality goods, sell them on the nationwide Swedemom platform, and become self-sustaining hubs that generate funds for their charitable programs. The original Swedemom sales website is about to be replaced with options to allow the individual hubs to show their own items. This will be so valuable for the ReStore to have their own online sales presence.

ReStore-Online-Logo

I have joined the SCOG Board of Directors but my focus is on helping the McMinnville Habitat ReStore become a successful casual hub. They have been developing this hub since I was helping MacHub and they have been making consistent progress with a the prospect of a huge upside potential. The ReStore model is a perfect fit, they have a donations intake operation that can easily expand beyond just taking in building and home items. For the last couple of months I have been providing consistency for running the ReStore Hub which in turn has given me a working perspective on the overall effort needed to be successful. Many of you may know how to sell items on eBay, however, taking it to a inventory based operation with daily sales fulfillment requires an organizational commitment.

We have a long way to go to fine tune the Swedemom model but we have the people and enough resources to guarantee success. Helping Habitat for Humanity fulfill their dream to create “A world where everyone has a decent place to live” does resonate with my passion. This is “Way Cool”, stay tuned as we get ready to setup more Habitat ReStore Hubs in Oregon.

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