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Always a Dog

I got my first dog when I was 8 years old. A year later I was old enough to take over my brother’s Indianapolis Star paper route in Lafayette, IN.

My First Dog, Cindy

My First Dog, Cindy

Her name was Cindy and she was a beautiful border collie with long flowing black and white fur. From the beginning we did everything together so I had no concerns about letting her accompany me on my paper route. I remember I used a to whistle to alert her to come back, but for the most part she was fairly free to explore the neighborhoods around Kossuth and 7th street. But tragedy struck one morning when she was hit by a car and died in my arms. Maybe the saddest experience of my life, because even now it is difficult to write about it.

I had to deal with all of this by myself, my parents were out of town and had left me at home probably with my sister and brother in charge. Actually, I think it was the first time my mother had accompanied my father on a business trip to Southern Indiana. As I sat on the curb with Cindy dying in my arms one of my paper route customers came out and quickly interpreted the situation. I did not know these people but they provided the adult support that I required. I don’t remember much about the rest of that day, I’m sure sadness overwhelmed me. My parents were contacted and then immediately headed home, but they would not be able to get home until late that night. The people who helped me that day coordinated everything which included giving me a new puppy that looked just like Cindy. I do remember my parents waking me up when they got home finding me sharing my bed with my new puppy, Cindy 2.

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Cindy 2 was my constant companion growing up

I finished growing up with Cindy 2, having to say goodbye to her when I left home after college.

This post turned out entirely different from what I originally intended. I was going to write a post about my current dog, Brook, and her new Instagram account, @AussieBrook. But instead I found myself starting off with my dog history and next thing I know I found myself writing about this incident that turned out to be very difficult to relive but probably therapeutic. Who knows maybe dealing with such sadness all by myself at such a young age shaped my personality.

I am returning from a business/pleasure trip to Phoenix so I had to put Brook in a kennel. This time I realized that I had some separation anxiety when I dropped her off. This is not normal for me but our relationship has grown to be very close. I am really looking forward to years of backpacking adventures with Brook.

Raising a Backpacking Buddy

Puppy Brook is growing up and I took her on her first backpacking trip this week. She did great and I’ll share some of that in a bit. But any baby growing into adulthood is an incredible experience. Sure it is a lot of work but also a rewarding experience. Brook is our 3rd Australian Shepherd so it is interesting to compare but also helpful to know what the breed tends toward. An Aussie is primarily interested in serving her master which historically has meant herding their flocks of animals. So raising an Aussie does mean that you break them of that herding instinct especially with the neighborhood kids. Aussies will learn whatever you want them to, but their independence is also very important. Right now I am tempering Brook’s need to be the protector with the social requirement for her to be friendly. This is the critical artistry of parenting a pet.

BrookDuringThunder

Riding out a Thunderstorm

Our backpacking trip was a simple overnight on the Opal Creek Trail near the north fork of the Santiam River east of Salem, OR. This is an easy hike highlighted with typical Oregon majesty. Brook’s trail etiquette continued to be outstanding, but that is really built from her Aussie traits. I was really wondering about canine backpacking issues like staying on the trail, crossing narrow tree truck bridges and ignoring forest wildlife. And of course the critical test for how she would handle sleeping in the forest. An additional test of how she would handle a thunderstorm greeted us first as we barely got the tent setup before the storm hit. I was not real happy with how I had to rush the setup of the tTrailBrooksment, but it provided shelter in the nick of time. Brook immediately had to decide whether going into this tent was acceptable but quickly realized it was fairly cool hanging out with her master in such a confined space. This may have turned out to be the most valuable lesson most of us dog owners deal with. How does your dog deal with thunderstorms. Most of my previous dogs have gone berserk during a storm. However, during this storm Brook was so happy hanging out with me in the tent that she had no reason to fear the loud thunder. I may finally have a dog that can deal with thunderstorms. Awe yes, but then there will be the fireworks test someday soon.

The overall backpacking experience was perfect. Brook initially did not want to cross narrow log bridges. She was nervous about all bridges but if they had rails on both sides she could handle it. She does seem a bit reluctant to explore streams, I kept telling Brook that the best drink is from those babbling brooks. She did want to sleep in the tent but that worked out OK since she did not get overly dirty or wet. She would go out into the night for a drink and things but she did not waste much time staying away from the tent. In the morning she did get a bit spooked by all the birds serenading us, but that was quickly forgotten when she discovered how much fun it was to run up and down all the little trails around the campsite.

The major problem Brook is still dealing with is riding in a car. She does not prefer to do this, however, she does not have a choice in this matter. This trip was extremely valuable lesson for her, even with the throwing up in the car. She will be able to handle car travel, but I don’t think she will ever desire it.

April 30 I will be backpacking the Wild Rogue Loop in southern Oregon. Unfortunately Brook will not be accompanying me due to the presence of poison oak and ticks in the area.

Introducing our New Aussie, Brook

Brook

Brook

At the end of my Timberline to Cascade Locks backpacking segment I was crushed by the news that my beloved dog, Abby, had died unexpectedly. Abby was 12+ and not able to backpack with me any longer, but losing her at a time when I was experiencing a dream that she should have been sharing with me was tough. My wife and I knew we would find a new dog when we felt the time was right. Well this post is dedicated to introducing you to our new dog, Brook, another Australian Shepard who is destined to be my new backpacking buddy.

Brook came from Gearhart Aussies on the Oregon Coast about a month and we have survived puppy training.  Plenty of accidents have been cleaned up and not to much chewing damage has occurred.

Broncos Fan

Broncos Fan

There is a period of time with the new puppy where your lives are not yours. You have to cater to the needs of the puppy at the expense of your own desires. However, you know it is short-lived especially when dealing with the intelligence that comes with the Australian Shepard breed.

Brook is a Blue Merle Aussie with piecing blue eyes. Her color scheme is beautiful with perfect marking of the reddish fur. She has already shown her commitment to being a Broncos fan during last weekend’s AFC Championship. Now we will prepare for the Super Bowl.

We will also hit the trail soon to expose Brook to the discipline needed for backpacking. I like her disposition of displaying initial caution with strangers or unusual activity, however, she quickly evaluates the situation and reacts appropriately.

My wife works in a hospital and would like for Brook to possibly accompany her as a comfort dog for her patients. I think Brook will be perfect for this duty. But the primary job for Brook will be to provide companionship for us, function as a watchdog and allow us to love her unconditionally for the rest of her life. A Dog’s life is so tough.

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Here is a video recap of the Gales Creek Hike in Tillamook State Forest.