Lost Coast Trail 2021

The Lost Coast Trail has become my early season getaway, but the year since Conquering the Lost Coast Trail in 2020 fueled a highly anticipated return. Permits for the LCT have become more coveted so you select your permit far in advance and hope for the best. This year’s permit was for February 18-22 and the weather appeared to be acceptable, however, rain was in the equation. We decided to do a Yoyo down and back from Mattole to avoid the brutal shuttle road over to Shelter Cove. I had my normal concerns about my now 66 year old body, but I also was highly interested in how my new exercise routine, Supernatural on Oculus, might enhance my backpacking experience.

This year Bryce and I welcomed Jeff, an experienced Wilderness Recreation Professional, to join us and the 2021 Trekking season was launched complete with Rainier Jubilee Beer. I do believe Jeff thanked me for the invite more than 100 times throughout the trek. We arrived at Mattole Trailhead at dusk on the 17th and found a spot to camp on the beach. Thursday was known to have rain in the forecast so we were grateful for every hour we got before it hit.

Low tide would occur around the middle of the day making for great flexibility, but the weather would dictate our progress. The Elephant Seals were strewn across the Punta Gorda Lighthouse stretch but they rarely emerged from their slumber. I’ll use the video below to document the Seals.

We were not making great time once we got on the trail, I think we knew that the weather was not going to cooperate to allow us to venture past the first tidal zone, so we enjoyed a leisurely stroll. It started raining around 2 pm and the wind out of the SW appeared to be an issue so we were looking for a campsite with a wind break. We ended up choosing the green knoll just as you enter into the overland section past Sea Lion Gulch.

First Night’s Campsite as it was starting to rain

We were able to get camp setup as the rain became more significant. By 4pm the rain had forced us into our tents for the remainder of the day and night. We had a significant amount of rain and the accompanying wind made it difficult to keep the moisture at bay. This is when you wish you had downloaded more media options to your phone to fill your time. But the rain began to retreat the following morning allowing us to pack up our wet gear and proceed south.

We were highly encouraged by the sight of blue skies but were were in for a weather mixed day which would include difficult stream crossing thanks to the overnight rain. (Stream Crossing Video later in the Post)

The weather bounced between a windy rain in our face to beautiful sunny breakouts. We were now hiking on the overland trail but needed to return to the beach at about the 5.5 mile mark. This turned out to be a bit precarious due to the recent rain. You have about a 20 foot drop down a steep eroding gully. Bryce ended up in surf slide down complete with a spill at the end, but no injury.

We were optimistic coming out of the tidal zone with beautiful sunbreaks but the weather report warned of another storm.

We wanted to venture past Spanish Flat, maybe down to Big Flat, but the rain and the wind were returning so we concluded that the wind breaks at Spanish Flat would be the better choice. We set up camp and had enough time to hike down to Kinsey Creek.

This was a much better evening since we weren’t forced into our tents until the sun went down, but then we were in for another night of heavier winds with rain. The next morning better weather complete with rainbows offered great motivation for our return north.

The hike back past the tidal zone was just as interesting as the hike in. Rain, wind and sun made for an eventful day. Streams were flowing as high as ever which made for some exciting crossings. (Documented in video below)

We decided we were going to camp somewhere near Mattole this night in preparation to head out from the LCT on Sunday morning.

After getting through the tidal zone the search for an acceptable campsite began. The problem with the stretch around the Punta Gorda Lighthouse is the presence of sea lions and free range cattle. We also were bucking a head wind which we were really hoping to get some shelter from.

Once past the initial tidal zone we were competing with cattle for the only decent campsites. We ended up clearing cow patties so we could camp.

Our final night on the LCT was beautiful and dry. We hiked out the next morning with plans for some frisbee golf, brewpub nourishment and to search for a campground for the the evening.

The Lost Coast Trail Rugged Beauty

My third Lost Coast Trail Trek was all that I could have hoped for. Bryce has become a trusted companion and the addition of Jeff was a benefit to all. My old body held up great and I can validate that my Oculus Supernatural exercise paid great dividends for my core and upper body. My knees were a bit sore but what the heck, first hike in 2021 was awesome.

Driving out from Mattole through Petrolia and over to Ferndale was as scenic as ever, complete with spotting the pickup in the tree.

We went on to play a round of Disc Golf in the Redwoods at Humboldt State University. Had an amazing dinner at the Mad River Brewery and got a great campsite at Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park. However, we should have checked the road conditions, because getting back to Oregon from this location turned out to be quite an adventure with Hwy 101 closed just to the north and then CA 96 closed near Happy Camp. So we ended up having to take CA 299 over to Redding, CA to then drive north via Hwy 5.

Previous Lost Coast Treks:

December of 2015 where I nearly did not survive: I Lost to the Lost Coast

February of 2020 when I returned to conquer the Lost Coast: Conquered the Lost Coast

About ghsmith76

Backpacker, Grandfather, Volunteer, Advisor, Mentor and still Technologically Aware. Greg retired as a technologist who served as a Chief Information Officer in Higher Education at various universities. Prior to the IT career in Academia, Greg was a Systems Consultant with Hewlett-Packard. Other early jobs included IT activity in the oil shale and coal mining industries along with owning a computer store in Steamboat Springs, Colorado.

Posted on February 25, 2021, in Adventure, Backpacking, Wilderness and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 5 Comments.

  1. WOW! Love this. How exciting. Elephant seal bulls and free range bulls!! Energizing! And the weather just added to the challenges. They just removed the free range cattle from the nature preserve next to The Holler, which included an Ankole Watusi Bull. The bull was here to protect the herd from the coyote packs, but he would routinely break down fences and send the herd into adjoining orchards which tended to exercise the orchard owners. The bull’s rack and attitude was definitely attention getting.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Sounds like an awesome trip although quite wet! Looking forward to hearing more next time we get together.

    Denny

    On Thu, Feb 25, 2021, 5:05 PM The Adventure Continues wrote:

    > ghsmith76 posted: ” The Lost Coast Trail has become my early season > getaway, but the year since Conquering the Lost Coast Trail in 2020 fueled > a highly anticipated return. Permits for the LCT have become more coveted > so you select your permit far in advance and hope for the” >

    Liked by 1 person

  3. The weather and stream crossings looked a bit chilly, but wow, what scenery – stunning!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Thanks for the post. Great pics! We met on the trail at I believe Randall Creek. We chatted it up a bit — you and Jeff. I could tell you guys were having fun. Your blog posts helped me in researching my trip. I was there the same days as you and had a wonderful time. That Friday night storm was something. The views were fantastic. It’s a challenging, enjoyable, peaceful hike. I’ll do it again. Oh man I’m jealous of your Raindogs! Good thinking. Cheers!

    Like

  1. Pingback: Supernatural Results and a Perfect Ski Day | The Adventure Continues

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