Embracing the Widespread Adoption of Consumer Technologies

I’m heading off to Ft Lauderdale tomorrow for a CIO Technology Summit where I am presenting a session entitled ”Embracing the Widespread Adoption of Consumer Technologies”. This will actually be a session following one focusing on how pervasive mobile computing has become and my goal will be to stimulate discussion on this topic that may change the landscape of higher education IT organizations.

Embracing adoption of consumer technologies does not sound unusual, however, what we are really talking about is embracing an adoption of mobile technologies that is moving so fast that it is breaking all of our old rules of IT management. But we are dealing with a different customer today and that is the real dilemma. This reminded me of my post about a year ago, where I talked about how Higher Education’s influence is changing. That post was referenced up by Marc Parry at the Chronicle using this quote:

Are universities losing their influence over the tech sector?
Yes, argues Greg Smith, chief information officer at George Fox University, in a provocative post on his blog.

This article generated significant discussion on the CIO forum and it diverged into many interpretations that had nothing to do with my real point, however, Parry summarized it accurately.

The influence stemmed from how students’ computing experience would affect their future buying habits, he says. As evidence of its decline, he points to how Apple “has not been catering to higher education with their shift to the new iPad consumer line,” and how Microsoft seems relatively unconcerned about universities as it tries to retain its business and government markets.

The point was, that our students were already committed to consumer technologies by the time they hit our campuses. That was not the case just a few years ago. So now a year later we brace for the coming academic year with real questions about how we will support the widespread adoption of consumer technologies. But this is moving way to fast due to the mobile computing influence along with many new variables such as E-Textbooks and the changing roll of our faculty needing to be coaches more then lecturers. IT has always catered to the academics by dictating technology  specifications and required software. However, that control is not only being questioned by our students but I am starting to question whether we need to dramatically shift the IT focus to coaching as well.

I go back to a recent post on support for mobile computing: “Our previous management of student computing is not wrong it is just not needed any more”. This just means that our support needs to transition and we can still govern the timeline, but it will be different. And I think our greatest challenge will be helping our faculty deal with this.

About ghsmith76

Greg Smith has retired. His last position was the Interim CIO at Western Washington University. Prior to WWU Greg was the CIO at Missouri S&T, and before that the CIO for George Fox University in Newberg, OR. Greg went to the Northwest from the Purdue School of Engineering and Technology in Indianapolis, IN. where he served as the Director of IT for 8 years. Prior to the IT career in Academia, Greg was a Systems Consultant with Hewlett-Packard primarily with the Analytical Group working out of San Francisco,Cincinnati and Indianapolis. Greg's passion as a CIO in Higher Education comes from his belief that Technology can benefit Teaching & Learning.

Posted on April 1, 2011, in Consumer Technology, iPad, IT Support, Mobile Computing and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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